Child Health and Human Development: Social, Economic and Environmental Factors

I. Leslie Rubin, MD (Editor)
Department of Pediatrics, Morehouse School of Medicine and President, Institute for the Study of Disadvantage and Disability, Atlanta, GA, USA

Joav Merrick, MD, MMedSci, DMSc, (Editor)
Medical Director, Health Services, Division for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Services, Jerusalem, Israel
Division of Adolescent Medicine, KY Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Lexington, Kentucky, USA
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel
Division of Pediatrics, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Centers, Mt Scopus Campus, Jerusalem, Israel
School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Series: Pediatrics, Child and Adolescent Health
BISAC: MED069000

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$179.00

Volume 10

Issue 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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The literature on children who grow up in circumstances of social and economic disadvantage is very much a part of the place and time. Charles Dickens (1812-1870) wrote much about children who suffered under the burden of being poor in 19th Century London. In that age of industrialization, technical advances brought much progress to society, but also resulted in seismic population shifts. Large numbers of people moved from rural agricultural settings and lifestyles to the cities, where the new engines of industry promised more opportunities, yet many people lived in abject poverty, and of course, children suffered the most.

We have made progress in many ways, but there are still many children living under vulnerable conditions particularly in poor countries, but also in rich countries, that affect their development, health and future. In this book, we have gathered some research studies that explore social, economic and environmental factors impacting on child health and human development, and provoke thinking on how we might improve the conditions for the children so that they fulfill their potential and become contributing members of society. (Imprint: Nova)

Introduction

Chapter 1. Break the Cycle of Environmental Health Disparities
(I. Leslie Rubin, Robert J. Geller, Janice Nodvin, Michele Marcus, Maeve Howett, Benjamin A. Gitterman and Joav Merrick, Innovative Solutions for Disadvantage and Disability, Atlanta, GA, USA, and others)

Chapter 2. Together We Can Break the Cycle
(Pamela J. Maxson, Children’s Environmental Health Initiative, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA)

Section 1: Social and Economic Factors

Chapter 3. Uninsured Children: Characteristics, Consequences and Solutions
(Kathryn Kay Lemmond, Georgia State University College of Law, Atlanta, GA, USA)

Chapter 4. Health of Children Living in Poverty
(Shava Cureton, Clark Atlanta University, Whitney M. Young Jr. School of Social Work, Austell, GA, USA)

Chapter 5. Impact and Risks of Recession
(Lidia Y. Quinones and Miles Anthony Irving, Educational Psychology and Special Education, College of Education, University of Georgia, Atlanta, GA, USA)

Section 2: Environmental Factors

Chapter 6. Rethinking the Role of Community Collected Data in Environmental Justice Movements
(Katheryne Taylor Kramer, Tulane University Law School, New Orleans, LA, USA)

Chapter 7. Agricultural Pesticides: Implications for Migrant Farmworkers and their Families
(Kara M. Koehrn and Martha H. Keating, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA)

Chapter 8. Pesticide Exposure and Neurodevelopment in Migrant Farmworker Children
(Rachel Kauffman, Michele Marcus, Judith L. Wold and Chensheng Lu, Nell Hodgkins Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA, and others)

Chapter 9. Mercury Exposure Education Provided by Women’s Health Clinics
(Victoria Chau, Sharleen Traynor, Katryne Lukens-Bull, Grazyna Pawlowicz, Gale Tucker-Disney, Aaron Hilliard and David Wood, Behavioral Science and Community Health Department, University of Florida, College of Public Health and Health Professions, Melbourne, FL, USA, and others)

Chapter 10. Early Childhood Lead Exposure
(Marie Lynn Miranda, Pamela J. Maxson and Dohyeong Kim, Children’s Environmental Health Initiative, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA)

Chapter 11. Crawl Spaces and Transmission of Mold
(Marie Lynn Miranda, M. Alicia Overstreet Galeano, Brack Hale and Wayne R. Thomann, Children’s Environmental Health Initiative, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, and others)

Chapter 12. Exposure to Inorganic Arsenic through Drinking Water
(Crystal P. Davis, Lijun Zhao, Dianjun Sun, Yanhui Gao and Yudan Wei, Department of Community Medicine, Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, GA, USA, and others)

Chapter 13. Arsenic Exposure among Children and Adolescents in the United States
(Gerald Blaney, An Nguyen, Jianmin Zhu and Yudan Wei, Department of Community Medicine, Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, GA, USA, and others)

Chapter 14. Neglected Tropical Disease Prevention Programs through Treaty Law
(Madison Ann Hardee, Tulane University Law School, New Orleans, LA, USA)

Section 3: Acknowledgements

Chapter 15. About the Editors

Chapter 16. About the Innovative Solutions for Disadvantage and Disability

Chapter 17. About the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSU)

Chapter 18. About the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Israel

Chapter 19. About the Book Series “Pediatrics, Child and Adolescent Health”

Section 4: Index

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