Cervical Spine Injuries: Epidemiology, Long-Term Outcomes and Complications

Joseph Simon Butler (Editor)
Department of Spinal Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, UK

Series: Muscular System – Anatomy, Functions and Injuries
BISAC: MED075000

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Volume 10

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Volume 2

Volume 3

Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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Spinal cord injury (SCI), and in particular cervical SCI, remains a devastating and catastrophic event for patients, their families and society, often producing severe and permanent disability. Moreover, the emotional and psychological consequences of coping with a disabling injury can be profound. SCIs are very often permanent, yet potentially preventable. Despite significant medical and technological advances in recent years the overall mortality for spinal injury patients remains largely unchanged.

Understanding the epidemiology, aetiology, medical and psychological factors associated with cervical spinal cord injury remains crucial in order to advance our knowledge on the identification of such devastating injuries, their possible prevention and ultimately on how to best manage the widespread physical, social and psychological effects of SCI at an individual and societal level. This book endeavors to describe the epidemiology of cervical spinal cord injury and to summarize some of the primary outcomes associated with this type of injury.

We devote chapters to such key topics as: Operative and non-operative outcomes following SCI; whiplash injury; neurological, respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary complications post cervical SCI and the psychological impact of cervical SCI; among others. This book does not provide an exhaustive background on the area of cervical spinal cord injury but rather compiles key information on the most commonly associated comorbid issues accompanying cervical spinal cord injury and encapsulates it to provide an accessible account of some principal topics relating to this particular type of SCI.
(Imprint: Nova Biomedical)

Preface

Chapter 1 - Epidemiology of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury (pp. 1-12)
Niall P. McGoldrick, MB BCh BAO, MRCSI (Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Ireland) and Joseph S. Butler, Ph.D., FRCS (Tr & Orth) (Department of Spinal Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, UK)

Chapter 2 - Soft Tissue and Whiplash Injuries: The Current Evidence Base (pp. 13-18)
Matthew Burn, M.D., Joseph Fernandez-Moure, M.D., Ennio Tasciotti, Ph.D. and Bradley K. Weiner, M.D. (The Methodist Hospital and Research Institute Houston, Texas, US)

Chapter 3 - Outcomes of Cervical Spine Injuries Following Non-Operative Management (pp. 19-38)
Jacob Yoong-Leong Oh, FRCS, Hwan-Tak Hee, FRCS (Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore) and Joseph S. Butler, Ph.D., FRCS (Tr & Orth) (Department of Spinal Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, UK)
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Chapter 4 - Long-Term Outcomes after Operatively Managed Cervical Spine Fractures (pp. 39-52)
Thomas Anderson, M.D., Ph.D. (Department of Trauma & Orthopedic Surgery, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Ireland)

Chapter 5 - Traumatic Adult Cervical Nerve Root Avulsion Injuries: Incidence, Assessment, Outcomes and Novel Surgical Strategies (pp. 53-76)
Roisin T. Dolan, MA, M.D., MRCSI, Kevin J. Cronin, MSc, FRCS (Department of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland), Joseph S. Butler, Ph.D., FRCS (Tr & Orth) (Department of Spinal Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, UK), Darragh E. Hynes, MCh, FRCS (Tr & Orth) (Department of Trauma & Orthopedic Surgery, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland)

Chapter 6 - Colorectal Dysfunction in Patients with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury (pp. 77-94)
John P. Burke, Ph.D., MRCSI (Department of Colorectal Surgery, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland)

Chapter 7 - Pressure Ulcer Management in Spinal Injury Patients: Pathophysiology, Treatment and Prevention (pp. 95-126)
Andrea Flannery, BSc., RN, (Department of Nursing Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Eccles St., Dublin, Ireland) Roisin T. Dolan, MA, M.D., MRCSI, Sean M. Carroll, FRCS (Department of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, St. Vincent’s University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland), Joseph S. Butler, Ph.D., FRCS (Tr & Orth) (Department of Spinal Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, UK) and Keith Synnott, FRCS (Department of Trauma & Orthopedic Surgery, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland)

Chapter 8 - Respiratory Complications Associated with Cervical Spinal Injuries (pp. 127-146)
Niall P. McGoldrick, MB BCh BAO, MRCSI (Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Ireland) and Joseph S. Butler, Ph.D., FRCS (Tr & Orth) (Department of Spinal Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, UK)

Chapter 9 - The Management of Thromboembolic Events Following Cervical Spine Injuries in the Acute and Rehabilitation Setting (pp. 147-164)
Eilis C. Dunning MBBChBAO (Department of Emergency Medicine, Adelaide & Meath Hospital Incorporating The National Children’s Hospital, Dublin, Ireland), Joseph S. Butler, Ph.D., FRCS (Tr & Orth) (Department of Spinal Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, UK) K. B. Wood, M.D. (Spine Service, Department of Trauma & Orthopaedic Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA) and Keith Synnott, FRCS (National Spinal Injuries Unit, Department of Trauma & Orthopaedic Surgery, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland)

Chapter 10 - Bladder Dysfunction in the Setting of Cervical Spinal Injuries (pp. 165-178)
Niall F. Davis, MBBChBAO and Tom Creagh, FRCSI (Department of Urology, Beaumont Hospital, Ireland)

Chapter 11 - Muscle Tone and Contractures in Cervical Spine Injuries (pp. 179-190)
Shane C O’Neill, MRCSI, MCh (Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Ireland), Joseph S. Butler, Ph.D., FRCS (Tr & Orth) (Department of Spinal Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, UK), Keith Synnott, FRCS (National Spinal Injuries Unit, Department of Trauma & Orthopaedic Surgery, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland)

Chapter 12 - Pain Management in Cervical Spine Injuries (pp. 191-206)
Shane C O’Neill, MRCSI, MCh (Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Ireland), Joseph S. Butler, Ph.D., FRCS (Tr & Orth) (Department of Spinal Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, UK), Keith Synnott, FRCS (National Spinal Injuries Unit, Department of Trauma & Orthopaedic Surgery, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland)

Chapter 13 - Psychological Problems Associated with Cervical Spine Injury (pp. 207-224)
Aine Butler, Ph.D., MRCPSych (St. John of God Hospital, Stillorgan, Co. Dublin, Ireland) and Joseph S. Butler, Ph.D., FRCS (Tr & Orth) (Department of Spinal Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, UK)

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