Certain Aspects of Georgian-Russian Relations in Modern Historiography

$145.00

David Muskhelishvili (Editor)
Doctor of Historical Sciences, Professor, Academician. Member of Georgian Academy of Sciences

Series: Caucasus Region Political, Economic, and Security Issues

In this scientific work on the basis of archival and rich historiographic literature, the dramatic history of Georgian and Russian relationships is shown; the tendentious, imperial and pseudoscientific views of the Russian President, Vladimir Putin, are criticized, as well as the opinions of the famous Soviet dissident, A. Sakharov, and modern Russian historians. All of them are exposed in falsification of historical documentations and in their irrelevant knowledge and dilettantism.

The second part of the collection refers to the historic aspects of Georgian-Russian relationships. In this scientific work, it is substantiated that in 1801 Georgia was conquered by Russia, the autocephaly of Georgia was violently abolished and the Georgian people were dictated by the Russian model of government.

Taking into consideration today’s situation, the book will help readers to understand the mechanism of Russian aggression which has been carried out by Russian rulers toward “minor nations” explaining their action as “paternity care”. (Imprint: Nova)

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Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter 1 – Georgia ―A Small Empire?! (pp. 1-8)
David Muskhelishvili (Georgian Academy of Sciences)

Chapter 2 – On New Anti-Georgian Insinuations of the Supporters of ―Independent‖ Abkhazia (pp. 9-28)
Zurab Papaskiri (Sokhumi State University, Georgia)

Chapter 3 – On the Question of Georgia‘s Participation in the Fight for the Caucasus in 1942-1943 in Russian Historiography (pp. 29-36)
Makvala Natmeladze (Board of the Centre for Historical, Ethnological, Religious Studies and Propaganda)

Chapter 4 – Two Russias and One Problem: The Georgian One (pp. 37-40)
Nodar Lomouri (Board of the Centre for Historical, Ethnological, Religious Studies and Propaganda)

Chapter 5 – Conquering or Voluntary Joining? (pp. 41-62)
Otar Janelidze (Tbilisi Ivane Javakhishvili University, Georgia)

Chapter 6 – The Russian Empire‘s Religious Policy in Georgia (The First Half of the 19th Century) (pp. 63-82)
Khatuna Kokrashvili (Institute of History at Ivane Javakhishvili University, Georgia)

Chapter 7 – The Beginning of Russian Colonial Rule in Georgia (pp. 83-96)
Mikheil Samsonadze (Board of the Centre for Historical, Ethnological, Religious Studies and Propaganda)

Chapter 8 – The Bolshevik Aggression of 1921 and the Russian Embassy in Georgia (pp. 97-108)
Otar Janelidze (Tbilisi Ivane Javakhishvili University, Georgia)

Appendix

Index

Additional information

Binding

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