Biological Oceanography Research Trends

$225.00

Editor: Léa P. Mertens

Biological oceanography concerns the biology and ecology of oceanic, marine, coastal and estuarine organisms. These range from viruses and bacteria to microbes and phytoplankton, from zooplankton and benthic invertebrates to shellfish, fish and marine mammals. The organisms live in a dynamic fluid easily described as a chemical soup that covers ~71% of the earth’s surface and is intimately coupled to the atmosphere, the seafloor and the land. Thus, to determine how organisms are influenced by their environment, biological oceanographers must function across many sub-disciplines such as biochemistry, genetics, physiology, behaviour, population dynamics and community ecology. They must be knowledgeable of ocean physics, chemistry, geology, and atmospheric and radiative processes. This new book presents research in this field from around the world.

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Table of Contents

Preface

Expert Commentary

Commentary – Steric and Mass-Induced Sea Level Trends Over the Mediterranean Sea from Altimetry Data; pp. 1-8
(F. Criado-Aldeanueva, J. Garcia-Lafuente, Dept. of Applied Physics, Univ. of Malaga, Spain, J. Del Rio Vera, Mission Planning and User Services Office, ESRIN/European Space Agency)

Research and Review Studies

Chapter 1. Research Trends on Demersal Fisheries Oceangraphy in the Mediterranean; pp. 9-65
(Joan Moranta, Antoni Quetglas, Enric Massuti, Centre Oceanografic de les Illes Balears, Palma, Spain)

Chapter 2. The Ecological Role of Zooplankton in the Twilight and Dark Zones of the Ocean; pp. 67-130
(Rolf Koppelmann, Jessica Frost, Univ. of Hamburg, Institute for Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany)

Chapter 3. Photochemical Mineralisation of Dissolved Organic Nitrogen; pp. 131-156
(Vassilis Kitidis, Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Prospect Place, Plymouth, UK, Gunther Uher, School of Marine Science and Technology, Newcastle Univ., UK)

Chapter 4. Sulfide Diffusion and Chemoautotrophy Requirements in an Extremophilic Worm Tube; pp. 157-175
(N. Le Bris, F. Chever, Dept. Etude des Ecosystemes Profonds, Plouzane, France, L. Anderson, F. Gaill, Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France)

Chapter 5. Assessing Biological-Physical Interaction in the Upper Ocean from Space: Advantages and Pitfalls; pp. 177-192
(G.S. Karabashev, P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia)

Chapter 6. Physiolgical Diversity in Widely Distributed Microzooplankton: Digestion in the Ciliate Euplotes Vannus;
pp. 193-206
(John R. Dolan, Marine Microbial Ecology, Villefranche-sur-Mer, France, D. Wayne Coats, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, MD, USA)

Chapter 7. Inefficient Si Uptake Kinetics by Natural Phytoplankton Assemblages in Oceanic and Plumewaters of the Western Atlantic Ocean; pp. 207-216
(Rebecca F. Shipe, Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Univ. of California, LA)

Chapter 8. Frontiers And Technological Advances In Microbial Processes And Carbon Cycling In The Ocean; pp. 217-267
(Nianzhi Jiao, Chuanlun Zhang, Feng Chen, Jinjun Kan and Fan Zhang)

Index

Additional information

Binding

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