Beyond the Lab: Applications of Cognitive Research in Memory and Learning

$195.00

Editors: Glenda Andrews and David Neumann (Griffith University Gold Coast, Australia)
Series: Psychology Research Progress
Perspectives on Cognitive Psychology

Psychological research in perception, learning, memory and cognition seeks to explain human thinking and behavior. This research is relevant to many everyday situations. However, the potential applications of research are often discussed only in general terms. Examining how research in areas such as memory and learning can be applied to everyday situations has the potential to lead to new insights that could ultimately solve many practical issues that exist in society today. This book examines four important areas of functioning: memory performance and how it might be improved; affective functioning with specific reference to anxiety and depression; perceptual functioning in relation to visual discomfort and colour perception; and children’s literacy learning and remediation of reading difficulties.

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Table of Contents

Preface

Contributors and Affiliations

Chapter I. Does video game playing impact on short-term memory task performance? pp. 1-24
(Karen Murphy, Glenda Andrews and Kirsty Williams, Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, Griffith Health Institute, Australia and others)

Chapter II. Prior exposure to words in meaningful conceptual hierarchies improves recall of randomly arranged words pp. 25-41
(Glenda Andrews, Joanne M. Todd, Jade Maurer, Kaya Beinke, Robert Teese and Magnus Reiestad, Griffith Health Institute & School of Psychology, Griffith University, Australia)

Chapter III. Self-referent encoding facilitates recency discrimination and recognition in episodic memory pp. 43-55
(Glenda Andrews, Karen Murphy, Michele Dunbar and Jillian Boyce, Griffith Health Institute & School of Psychology, Griffith University, Australia)

Chapter IV. Context effects on memory retrieval following the Pavlovian extinction process in humans and its application in the reduction of return of fear pp. 57-82
(Siavash Bandarian Balooch, David L. Neumann and Mark J. Boschen, School of Psychology, Griffith University, Australia and others)

Chapter V. The relationship between different measures of fear learning following tests for reinstatement and spontaneous recovery of extinguished conditioned fear pp. 83-108
(David L. Neumann, Ottmar V. Lipp and Meredith J. McHugh, School of Psychology, Griffith University, Australia and others)

Chapter VI. Event-related potential (ERP) indices of emotional biases in depression: The role of working memory inhibitory control deficits pp. 109-145
(Rachel Dati, Tim Cutmore and David Shum, School of Psychology and Behavioral Basis of Health, Griffith University, Australia)

Chapter VII. Migraine and visual discomfort: The effects of pattern sensitivity on performance pp. 147-174
(Elizabeth Conlon, Leanne Prideaux and Kirsteen Titchener, School of Psychology and Behavioral Basis of Health Research Program, Giffith University, Australia)

Chapter VIII. From thresholds to colour names: The application of an opponent-process model pp. 175-195
(Trevor J. Hine, William H. Mcllhagga and Graeme R. Cole,Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia and others)

Chapter IX. Multisensory methods for early literacy learning pp. 197-216
(Michelle M. Neumann, Merv B. Hyde, David L. Neumann, Michelle Hood and Ruth M. Ford, School of Psychology, Griffith University, Australia and others)

Chapter X. The role of cognitive and perceptual factors in emergent literacy pp. 217-247
(Michelle Hood, Elizabeth Conlon and Glenda Andrews, Griffith Health Institute and School of Psychology, Griffith University, Australia)

Chapter XI. The effectiveness of school-based learning support services for children with word-level reading disability pp. 249-272
(Craig Wright and Elizabeth Conlon, Understanding Minds, School of Psychology, Griffith University, Australia and others)

Index

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