Behavioral Pediatrics I: Introduction. Fifth Edition

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Donald E. Greydanus, MD, Dr HC (Athens), FAAP, FIAP (HON) – Professor & Founding Chair, Department of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, MI, USA
Dilip R. Patel, MD, MPH, MBA – Professor & Chair, Department of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University, Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, MI
Ahsan Nazeer, MDProfessor, Division Chief, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Sidra Medical and Research Center, Qatar Foundation, Doha, Qatar
Roger W. Apple, PhD – Director, Division of Pediatric Psychology, Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI USA
Joav Merrick, MD, MMedSci, DMSc – Professor of Pediatrics at the Division of Pediatrics, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Mt Scopus Campus, Jerusalem, Israel, Kentucky Children’s Hospital, University of Kentucky, Lexington, United States and Professor of Public Health at the Center for Healthy Development, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, United States, the former Medical Director of the Division for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Services, Jerusalem and the Founder and Director of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Israel.

Series: Pediatrics, Child and Adolescent Health
BISAC: MED102000; MED057000
DOI: https://doi.org/10.52305/NKHV5194

Behavioral pediatrics is a multidisciplinary field that involves many healthcare specialists revolving around the practicing pediatrician and primary care clinician; also, various additional, associated fields of training have developed such as developmental-behavioral pediatrics, neurodevelopmental pediatrics, pediatric psychodermatology and medical care for those of all ages with developmental disabilities. Experts in psychiatry and psychology work closely with pediatric clinicians in a variety of professional relationships, including co-located and non-co-located mental health settings. Pediatricians can provide a wide variety of care to children and adolescents with complex disorders, depending on their training as well as interests, and this book seeks to provide au courant perspectives in behavioral pediatrics. Behavioral health screening remains an important task of pediatricians and behavioral pediatricians as they evaluate their pediatric patients.

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Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter 1. Integrated mental health in primary care offices
Salma Malik1, MD, Sheena Joychan1, MD, Julie Goslee1, MD, Michael DiBianco1, MD, Lara Addesso1, MD, Nehdia Hashemi2, MD, and Ahsan Nazeer3, MD
1Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Living/Hartford HealthCare, Hartford, Connecticut, United States of America
2Family Medicine, Borgess Medical Center, Plainwell, Michigan
3Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Sidra Medicine/Weill Cornell Medicine, Doha, Qatar

Chapter 2. Normal child and adolescent psychological development
Sherry L Pancost1, MA, Anna N Holowicki2, BS and Bethlehem S Belachew3, MA
1Department of Counseling and Human Development, College of Education and Human Development, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, United States of America
2Department of Counseling Psychology, College of Education, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America
3Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Science, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America

Chapter 3. Behavioral and psychological assessment in pediatric primary care settings
Summer Chahin1, MA and Anna N Holowicki2, BS
1Department of Psychology, Western Michigan University, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan and 2Department of Counseling Education and Counseling Psychology, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America

Chapter 4. Mindfulness-based interventions with children and adolescents
Karen Horneffer-Ginter, PhD
Culture and Wellness, Medical Ethics, Humanities and Law, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America

Chapter 5. Behavioral aspects of chronic illness
Bethelhem Belachew, MA, Kalani A Gates, MA, and Summer Chahin, MA
Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan and Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine,
Division of Pediatric Psychology, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America

Chapter 6. Unintentional death in childhood
Dustin C Rowland, MS and Maya Giaquinta, BA, BS
Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America

Chapter 7. Coping and adaptation to chronic illness and disability for children and
adolescents: Focus on cystic fibrosis
Roger W Apple, PhD
Pediatric Psychology Subspecialty, Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker M. D. School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America

Chapter 8. Learning disabilities
Dilip R Patel, MD, MBA, MPH, Donald E Greydanus, MD, DrHC(Athens), Eun Im, MD, Mariam Ischander, MBBCh, Blair Graham, MD, and Jessica Sarric, MD
Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America

Chapter 9. Intellectual disability (intellectual developmental disorder)
Nicole Fledderman1, MD, Ethel Clemente1, MD, Joav Merrick2-5, MD, MMedSci, DMSc and Dilip R Patel1, MD, MBA, MPH
1Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America
2National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel
3Division of Pediatrics, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Mt Scopus Campus, Jerusalem, Israel
4Kentucky Children’s Hospital, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, Kentucky, United States of America
5Center for Healthy Development, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, United States of America

Chapter 10. Dysgraphia
Peter Chung1,2, MD, Ashley Tang3, MD and Dilip R Patel3, MD, MBA, MPH
1The Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders, University of California, Irvine, California, United States of America
2Mattel Children’s Hospital, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America
3Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America

Chapter 11. Dyscalculia
Khadijah Hussain1, BS and Neelkamal Soares2, MD
1Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan and 2Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America

Chapter 12. Autism spectrum disorder
Salma Malik1, MD, MS, DFAACAP, DFAPA, Areej Al Siaghy2, MBBS, Pragya Kalla1, DO, Ashley Sánchez-Ramos1, MD, Aleeza Azeem3 and Ahsan Nazeer4, MD
1Institute of Living, Hartford Healthcare, Hartford, Connecticut, United States of America
2Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
3American School of Doha, Doha, Qatar
4Department of Psychiatry, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Sidra Medicine, Doha, Qatar

Chapter 13. Sensory processing difficulties
Denise Hoffman1, OTD, OTRL, BCP, Rachel Tomassi2 and Neelkamal Soares3, MD
1Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Rehabilitation Science, Indiana University South Bend; Elkhart, Indiana
2Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan and
3Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America

Chapter 14. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
Donald E Greydanus, MD, DrHC(Athens) and Dilip R Patel, MD, MBA, MPH
Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America

Chapter 15. Oppositional defiant and conduct disorders: Current perspectives
Donald E Greydanus1, MD, DrHC(Athens), and Cheryl A Dickson1,2, MD, MPH
1Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
2Health Equity and Community Affairs, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America

Chapter 16. Concepts of aggression: Perspectives in the 21st century
Donald E. Greydanus1, MD, DrHC(Athens), Joseph R Hawver2, JD and Dustin C Rowland3, MS
1Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan
2Deputy Supervisor, Canton Community, Canton, Michigan
3Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America

Chapter 17. Major depressive and dysthymic disorders
Khalid Elzamzamy1, MD, MA and Yasser Saeed Khan2, MBBS, DCP, PGDip, MRCPsych, CCT
1Institute of Living/Hartford HealthCare, Connecticut, United States of America
2Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar

Chapter 18. Postpartum depression
Arthur N Feinberg1, MD, Donald E Greydanus1, MD, DrHC(Athens) xand Lyubov Matytsina-Quinlan2, MD, PhD
1Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America
2East Cheshire Centre for Sexual Health, East Cheshire NHS Trust, Macclesfield District General Hospital, Macclesfield, Cheshire, United Kingdom

Chapter 19. Pediatric bipolar disorder
Ahsan Nazeer1, MD, Nehdia Hashemi2, MD, Nazish Imran3, MRCPsych, Sadiq Naveed4, MD, Muhammad Waqar Azeem1, MD and Norbert Skokauskas5, MD, PhD
1Sidra Medicine, Doha, Qatar
2Tadawi Medical Center, Doha, Qatar
3King Edward Medical University, Lahore, Pakistan
4Institute of Living, Hartford Health Care, Hartford, Connecticut, United States of America
5Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Torgarden, Norway

Chapter 20. Anxiety disorders
Shannon Simmons, MD, MPH, Lauren Boydston, MD, William P French, MD, and Christopher K Varley, MD
Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, Washington, United States of America

Chapter 21. Obsessive-compulsive disorder
Shannon Simmons, MD, MPH, William P French, MD, Lauren Boydston, MD, and Christopher K Varley, MD
Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, Washington, United States of America

Index