Atrazine Degradation using Alginate Encapsulated Rhodococcus erythroplis N19621

Tony Vancov (Editor)
Karen Jury (Editor)
Wollongbar Primary Industries Institute, NSW, Australia

Series: Environmental Science, Engineering and Technology
BISAC: SCI026000

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Volume 10

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Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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Rhodococcus erythropolis NI86/21 encapsulated cells have the potential to reduce residual atrazine in soil, thereby minimising the likelihood of off-site transport to ground and/or river water. They can also reduce crop loss because of residual herbicide. This study describes the formulation of an encapsulation procedure for R. erythropolis NI86/21 and demonstrates its use as a slow release inoculant for reducing atrazine levels in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Several bead amendments, including bentonite, powdered activate carbon (PAC) and skim milk (SM) were evaluated for slow release of R. erythropolis NI86/21 and atrazine degradation. This book examines research which discusses how the beads beads presented in the study provided high numbers of vigorous R. erythropolis cells in both liquid and soil media to degrade atrazine. (Imprint: Nova)

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION

METHODS: PREPARATION OF CALCIUM ALGINATE BEADS

ATRAZINE DEGRADATION IN AQUEOUS MEDIA AND SOILS

RESULTS

DISCUSSION

CONCLUSION

REFERENCES

INDEX

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