Aquatic Resources Potential to Foster Food Security in Developing Countries

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Margarida Saavedra, PhD – Researcher, Aquaculture, Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere, I.P., Lisbon, Portugal

Series: Food Science and Technology; Food and Beverage Consumption and Health
BISAC:TEC049000; TEC012030; NAT038000
DOI: https://doi.org/10.52305/EXOT0352

The book Aquatic Food Potential to Foster Food Security in Developing Countries aims to contribute scientific knowledge to formulate better strategies against hunger, including the valuable marine and freshwater resources that are now more and affordable due to aquaculture. It includes strategies of two countries – Angola and Brazil – to increase food security, innovative techniques to disinfect and scan for microorganisms and showcase studies located in Africa and South America, highlighting the impact of aquaculture on improving the availability and quality of food as well as family´s livelihoods. 

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Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter 1. Finding Solutions for Food Security: The Role of Aquaculture
Margarida Saavedra¹,²,³
¹Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere, I.P (IPMA), Division of Aquaculture and Upgrading, Lisboa, Portugal
²Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR), University of Porto, Terminal de Cruzeiros do Porto de Leixões, Matosinhos, Portugal
³MARE- Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre & ARNET- Aquatic Research Network Associated Laboratory, NOVA School of Science and Technology, NOVA University of Lisbon, Portugal

Chapter 2. Angola: Food Security as a Development Challenge
Carmen Van-Dúnem Santos¹ and Carla Serrão²
¹Agostinho Neto University, Luanda, Angola
²NOVA School of Science and Technology, NOVA University, Lisbon, Portugal

Chapter 3. Brazil’s Actions for the Development of Sustainable Aquaculture
Carolina Mendes Costa, Bruno Machado Queiroz, Juliana Lopes da Silva and Mauricio Nogueira da Cruz Pessôa
Brazilian Government – Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture (MPA), Aquaculture National Secretary (SNA). Edifício Siderbras, Setor de Autarquias Sul Q. 2 – Brasília, Brazil

Chapter 4. Seafood and Nutrition: Importance of Lipids
Narcisa Maria Bandarra¹,²
¹Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere (IPMA, I.P.), Avenida Doutor Alfredo Magalhães Ramalho 6, Algés, Portugal
²Interdisciplinary Center of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR), Terminal de Cruzeiros de Leixões, Matosinhos, Portugal

Chapter 5. Comparison of Wild and Farmed Meagre, Argyrosomus regius, Lipid Composition
Margarida Saavedra¹,²,³, Sara Costa¹, José Guil-Guerrero⁴, Pedro Pousão-Ferreira⁵, and Narcisa Bandarra¹,²
¹Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere, I.P (IPMA) Division of Aquaculture and Upgrading, Rua Alfredo Magalhães Ramalho, Lisboa; Portugal
²Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR), University of Porto, Av. General Norton de Matos, Matosinhos, Portugal
³MARE- Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre & ARNET- Aquatic Research Network Associated Laboratory, NOVA School of Science and Technology, NOVA University of Lisbon, Portugal
⁴Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Almería, Spain, Olhão, Portugal

Chapter 6. Enhancing Food Security and Safety: The Promising Role of Bacteriophages from Farm to Table
Subhasish Roy
Cristóbal Chaidez, Jean P. González-Gómez, Alma K. Orozco-Ochoa, and Cecilia C. Sánchez-Armenta
Laboratorio Nacional para la Investigación en Inocuidad Alimentaria (LANIIA), Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A.C. (CIAD), Culiacán, México

Chapter 7. Hurdles and Challenges for Bivalve Seafood Quality and Safety
João C.R. Cardoso¹, Inês C. Leal¹, Carmen Van Dunem Santos² and Deborah M. Power¹
¹Comparative Endocrinology and Integrative Biology, Algarve Centre of Marine Sciences (CCMAR-Algarve), Universidade do Algarve, Faro, Portugal
²Universidade do Namibe, Farol de Noronha, Moçâmedes, Namibe

Chapter 8. Valorisation of Fish Discards and By-Products
Carla Pires¹,², Ana Teresa Ribeiro³,⁴,⁵, Cidalina Nogueira6 , and Irineu Batista¹
¹Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere (IPMA, I. P.), Lisbon, Portugal
²Interdisciplinary Center of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR), Matosinhos, Portugal
³Polytechnic Institute of Santarém, Superior School of Agriculture, Department of Food Technology, Biotechnology and Nutrition, Santarém, Portugal
⁴CIEQV – Research Centre in Health Quality, Polytechnic Institute of Santarém, Complexo Andaluz, Santarém, Portugal
⁵MED – Mediterranean Institute for Agriculture, Environment and Development, University of Évora, Pólo da Mitra, Évora, Portugal
⁶Ministério das Pescas e do Mar, Complexo Administrativo, Clássicos do Talatona, Luanda, Angola

Chapter 9. Extension Nurtures Food Security through Small-Scale Aquaculture in Upcountry Liberia
Joseph K. Buttner¹, George Weefar², Zizi Kpadeh², Johnson Yarkpawolo² , and Harris Mallay²
¹Department of Biology, Salem State University, Salem, MA, USA
²National Fisheries and Aquaculture Authority, Freeport, UN Drive, Bushrod Island, Monrovia, Liberia

Chapter 10. A Socio-Economical Profile of Mollusks Farmers in Santa Catarina, Brazil: Baselines for the Development of Seaweed Cultivation
Alex Alves dos Santos¹, Sarah de Jesus Cantarino², and Leila Hayashi²,
¹EPAGRI – Agricultural Research and Rural Extension Company of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil
²Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC) – Department of Aquaculture, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil

Index

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