Advances in Chemistry Research. Volume 76

$250.00

James C. Taylor (Editor)

Series: Advances in Chemistry Research
BISAC: SCI013000

This book is a collection of eleven chapters discussing various topics on recent advances in chemistry research. Chapter One discusses the potential use of hydrogels in engineering applications. Chapter Two reviews multifunctional supramolecular gels. Chapter Three discusses the various processes used to dry aromatic plants and their effects on final product quality. Chapter Four is an analysis of Single Crystal X-ray structures and anticancer activity studies on substances derived from thiazolidine. Chapter Five examines the design and function of low molecular mass gelators based on derivatives of thiazolidine. Chapter Six is a review of the properties of bismuth niobate-based materials via impedance spectroscopy, a powerful and non-destructive technique. Chapter Seven examines the use of nitrogen containing conjugated building blocks for use in organic electronics. Chapter Eight is a study of transition metal dichalcogenides through an ab-initio approach. Chapter Nine reviews the synthesis process as well as antioxidant and antibacterial properties of substances derived from thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid. Chapter Ten examines the potential to remove beryllium from aqueous solutions by means of chelating resins. The final chapter discusses the removal of beryllium from aqueous solutions, but presents the possibility of doing so by means of biopolymer-enhanced ultrafiltration.

Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter 1. Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering Applications
Trinath Biswal
Dept. of Chemistry, Veer Surendra Sai University of Technology, Burla, Sambalpur, Odisha, India

Chapter 2. Multifunctional Supramolecular Gels – An Overview
Varsha Bhardwaj and Amar Ballabh
Department of Chemistry, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat, India

Chapter 3. Drying of Aromatic Plants: Processes and Effects
Aida Moreira Silva¹,², Maria João Barroca¹,², Sofia Guiné Florença³, Elena Bartkiene⁴, David Castelão⁵ and Raquel P. F. Guiné⁵
¹R&D Unit in Molecular Chemistry-Physics, Department of Chemistry, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
²Polytechnic of Coimbra, Agriculture School of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
³FCNAUP, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
⁴Department of Food Safety and Quality, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania
⁵CERNAS Research Centre, Polytechnic Institute of Viseu, Viseu, Portugal

Chapter 4. Single Crystal X-Ray Structures and Anticancer Activity Studies on Thiazolidine Derivatives
Rohidas M. Jagtap¹, Sachin S. Sakate¹, Satish K. Pardeshi² and Masood A. Rizvi³
¹Department of Chemistry, P. E. S. Modern College of Arts, Science and Commerce (Autonomous), Shivajinagar, Pune, MS, India
²Department of Chemistry, Savitribai Phule Pune University (Formerly University of Pune), Ganeshkhind, Pune, MS, India
³Department of Chemistry, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Chapter 5. Low Molecular Mass Gelators Based on Thiazole Derivatives: Design and Function
Varsha Bhardwaj and Amar Ballabh
Department of Chemistry, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat, India

Chapter 6. Impedance Spectroscopy Characterization of a Niobate Material for RF Applications
S. Devesa¹,², M. P. Graça² and L. C. Costa²
¹CFisUC, Physics Department, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
²I3N and Physics Department, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal

Chapter 7. Nitrogen Containing Conjugated Building Blocks for Use in Organic Electronics
Neha Rani Kumar
Department of Chemistry, Dhemaji College, Dhemaji, Assam, India

Chapter 8. Study of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides Compounds MS2 (M = Ti, Mo, W): An Ab-Initio Approach
Vandana B. Parmar and A. M. Vora
Department of Physics, University School of Sciences, Gujarat University, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India

Chapter 9. Synthesis, Antioxidant and Antibacterial Properties of Thiazolidine-4-Carboxylic Acid Derivatives
Rohidas M. Jagtap¹, Sachin S. Sakate¹, Satish K. Pardeshi² and Masood A. Rizvi³
¹Department of Chemistry, P. E. S. Modern College of Arts, Science and Commerce, Shivajinagar (Autonomous), Pune, MS, India
²Department of Chemistry, Savitribai Phule Pune University (Formerly University of Pune), Ganeshkhind, Pune, MS, India
³Department of Chemistry, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Chapter 10. Removal of Beryllium (Be2+) from Aqueous Solutions by Chelating Resins
Buse Nur Tunçel, BSc, Begüm Göksoy, BSc, Ozan Ali Dündar, MSc, and Özgür Arar, PhD
Department of Chemistry, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey

Chapter 11. Removal of Beryllium (Be2+) from Aqueous Solutions by Biopolymer-Enhanced Ultrafiltration
Rabia Temiz and Özgür Arar, PhD
Department of Chemistry, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey

Index