Advances in Cereal and Pseudocereal Research for Functional Foods

Naofumi Morita (Editor)
Department of Food Packaging Technology, Toyo College of Food Technology, Hyogo, Japan

Pham Van Hung (Editor)
HoChiMinh City International University, HoChiMinh City, Vietnam

Tomoko Maeda (Editor)
Department of Life and Health Sciences, Hyogo University of Teacher Education, Hyogo, Japan

Series: Food Science and Technology
BISAC: TEC012000

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Volume 10

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Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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Wheat and related grasses such as barley, rye, amaranth and quinoa have always been important for foods in Europe, the Levant and the western part of Asia. The food products of these cereals and pseudo-cereals have been mostly produced from white flours, which are milled from whole grains using the conventional milling method. Although the texture and sensory qualities of the products made from the white flours have been improved, the nutritive values of these products have become lower because most of the nutritional compounds such as dietary fiber, resistant starch, vitamins, minerals and microconstituents in the bran and germ have been removed from the white flours. Therefore, the consumption of whole grains has been considered to have many physiological benefits related to “western diseases” such as coronary heart disease, colon cancer and diabetes.

Recently, researchers tried to find a good method to prepare foodstuffs containing sufficient amounts of nutritional compounds, especially dietary fiber and minerals. In this book, recent advances in cereal and pseudo-cereal based food researches have been reviewed. New milling techniques have been applied to produce graded flours which contain large amounts of dietary fiber, vitamins and minerals and could be applied for substitution with the conventionally milled flour in breadmaking to produce functional food products with high safety, palatability and nutrition. In addition, germination of cereal and pseudo-cereal grains helps to improve the chemical compositions, nutritive values and acceptability characteristics of functional food products. All of this useful information can be seen in this book. (Imprint: Nova)

Preface

Section 1: Wheat Researches and Developments for Functional Foods

Chapter 1. Polished-grading Technique
(Tomoko Maeda and Naofumi Morita, Hyogo University of Teacher Education, Hyogo, Japan, and others)
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Chapter 2. Sourdough Bread
(Tomoko Maeda, Ji Hyun Kim and Naofumi Morita, Department of Science, Technology, and Human Life, Graduate School of Education, Hyogo University of Teacher Education, Hyogo, Japan, and others)

Chapter 3: Advances in Waxy and High-Amylose Wheat Research
(Pham Van Hung and Naofumi Morita, School of Biotechnology, International University, National University in Ho Chi Minh City, Linh TrungWard, Thu Duc District, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and others)

Section 2: Buckwheat-based Functional Food Development

Chapter 4. Polished-grading Buckwheats for Functional Foods
(Pham Van Hung, Kazuyoshi Miyake and Naofumi Morita, School of Biotechnology, International University, National University in HoChiMinh City, Linh TrungWard, Thu Duc District, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and others)

Chapter 5. Germinated Buckwheat for Functional Foods
(Naofumi Morita, Kazuyoshi Miyake, Tomoko Maeda and Pham Van Hung, Department of Food Packaging Technology, Toyo College of Food Technology, Hyogo, Japan, and others)
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Section 3: Pseudocereal-based Functional Food Development

Chapter 6. Germinated Quinoa for Functional Foods
(Naofumi Morita, Sang Ha Park and Tomoko Maeda, Department of Food Packaging Technology, Toyo College of Food Technology, Hyogo, Japan, and others)

Chapter 7. Germinated Amaranth for Functional Foods
(Naofumi Morita, Motoki Yamaoka and Tomoko Maeda, Department of Food Packaging Technology, Toyo College of Food Technology, Hyogo, Japan, and others)

Section 4: Starch Modification for Functional Food Development

Chapter 8. Starch Modification
(Megumi Miyazaki, Pham Van Hung and Naofumi Morita, Research and Development Division, Yamazaki Baking Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan, and others)

Chapter 9. Application of Chemically Modified Starches for Breadmaking
(Pham Van Hung, Megumi Miyazaki and Naofumi Morita, School of Biotechnology, International University, National University in HoChiMinh City, Linh TrungWard, Thu Duc District, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and others)

Index

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