Adult, Continuing and Lifelong Education and Development in Africa

Akwasi Arko-Achemfuor (Editor), Kofi Poku Quan-Baffour and David Addae
University of South Africa, South Africa

Series: Education in a Competitive and Globalizing World
BISAC: POL053000

Clear

Volume 10

Issue 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

eBook

Digitally watermarked, DRM-free.
Immediate eBook download after purchase.

Product price
Additional options total:
Order total:

Quantity:

Details

This book addresses current and pertinent issues in adult, community, and lifelong education and development presenting a distinctive and timely focus on Africa. Drawing from a variety of theoretical, methodological, and personal experiences from astute researchers from different parts of the continent, this book re-conceptualises adult, community and lifelong education from a western perspective to a more Afrocentric and indigenous approach to understanding and solving problems in the field.

It attempts to fill that gap by placing emphasis on the history of adult, lifelong and community education, its organization and management, and the philosophical and socioeconomic context within which adult, community and lifelong education is provided. This edited book is a comprehensive collection of cutting edge research and analyses of various concepts in the field and offers in-depth explanations from diverse viewpoints. For ease of reference, this book is organized into 17 chapters with each chapter covering a topical issue in a diverse, multifaceted field.

All the chapters were subjected to a rigorous review process. Firstly, by the editors before those that met the initial pre-screening were sent to two other reviewers. These steps were taken to ensure that the chapters were within the scope of the book as well as meeting the set standards. The submissions which did not meet the set standards and/or did not fall within the scope of the book were rejected. The ones that were recommended for inclusion by the reviewers were sent to the authors to correct and resubmit. The corrected chapters from the authors were put together as the manuscript which was submitted to an accredited language editor for editing before finally submitting to the publisher.

The contributions are on five African countries with all the contributors from Africa. Consequently, this book differs from many publications about African countries written by non-Africans.”

Although all the chapters focus on African countries, the scholarly and rigorous discussion by the authors may appeal to international audiences in the field of adult, lifelong and community education.
(Imprint: Nova)

Preface

Chapter 1. Overview: Adult, Community and Lifelong Education and Development in Africa
(Akwasi Arko-Achemfuor, Kofi Poku Quan-Baffour and David Addae, University of South Africa, South Africa, and others)

Chapter 2. Defining Adult Education as a Field of Study and a Practice: An Overview
(Olivia Adwoa Tiwaah Frimpong Kwapong, Department of Adult Education and Human Resource Studies, University of Ghana, Africa)

Chapter 3. Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Adult Learning
(Maximus Monaheng Sefotho, University of Johannesburg, South Africa)

Chapter 4. Adult Education and Indigenous Knowledge Systems
(Selloane Pitikoe, Department of Adult Education, University of Eswatini, Kwaluseni, Eswatini)

Chapter 5. Ethical Issues in Adult Education Research: Beyond the Belmont Model
(Norma RA Romm and Madaleen Claassens, Department of Adult Basic Education, University of South Africa)

Chapter 6. Enhancing Community Education through the Lens of Community Vocational Education: A Strategy for Addressing Unemployment in South Africa?
(Manto Sylvia Ramaligela, University of Limpopo, South Africa)

Chapter 7. Managing University of Ghana Learning Centres as Service-Delivery Organisations: How Can Kouzes and Posner’s (2012) Management Model Explain Their Transformation?
(Michael Aryitey Tagoe and Inusah Salifu, School of Continuing and Distance Education, College of Education, University of Ghana, Ghana)

Chapter 8. Innovative Assessment Practices in Adult Basic Education: The Kha Ri Gude Programme in South Africa
(Kofi Poku Quan-Baffour, University of South Africa, South Africa)

Chapter 9. Adult Women Education: A Missing Link in the Niger Delta – Nigeria Amnesty Project
(Matthew Osaigbovo Ovbiebo and Onoriode Collins Potokri, University of South Africa, Faculty of Education, South Africa, and others)

Chapter 10. Learner Support in Adult Education
(Alex Kortey Addo, Department of Adult Education and Human Resource Studies, University of Ghana, South Africa)

Chapter 11. The Use of Employability Skills Development as a Panacea for the Economic Problems in Africa
(Florah Moleko Teane, University of South Africa, South Africa)

Chapter 12. Perceptions of Adult Learners’ on the Facilitation Methods in Adult Education in South Africa
(Amohelang Masibongile Machobane and Akinagum Fidelis Esenjor, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa, and others)

Chapter 13. Adult Basic Education and Small Business Development in South Africa
(Akwasi Arko-Achemfuor, University of South Africa, South Africa)

Chapter 14. A Comparison Study of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Botswana
(Manto Sylvia Ramaligela, Moses Makgato and Jerald Hondonga, Department of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, University of Limpopo, Polokwane, South Africa, and others)

Chapter 15. Adult Education in Correctional Facilities: A Global Perspective
(LR Johnson and NG Vandala, ABET and Youth Development, School of Educational Studies, University of South Africa, and others)

Chapter 16. The Kabake Programme: Popular Education to Address Community Challenges in Acholiland, Northern Uganda
(Francis Akena Adyanga, Faculty of Education, Department of Foundation of Education, Kabale University, Uganda)

Chapter 17. Incentivised Volunteerism in Non-Formal Adult Education in Ghana: Facilitators’ Perceptions
(David Addae, Samuel Amponsah and Richard D. Afare, Department of Adult Education and Human Resource Studies, Ghana, and others)

Index

You have not viewed any product yet.