Adolescence and Health: Some International Perspectives

Joav Merrick, MD, MMedSci, DMSc, (Editor)
Medical Director, Health Services, Division for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Services, Jerusalem, Israel
Division of Adolescent Medicine, KY Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Lexington, Kentucky, USA
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel
Division of Pediatrics, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Centers, Mt Scopus Campus, Jerusalem, Israel
School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Series: Pediatrics, Child and Adolescent Health
BISAC: MED069000

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$275.00

Volume 10

Issue 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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Think positive and not negative. For too long, the “deficiency” or “pathological” approach in understanding children and adolescents has been prevalent, but in recent years we have seen a greater interest in positive youth development programs with a shift from looking at the negative to turning the related programs and approach into something positive and highlighting the positive side of youth development.

This has resulted in a focus on talents, strengths, interests and potential in order to facilitate a stronger and better youth development. Instead of viewing children and adolescents as “problems” or “issues” to be resolved, they are regarded as “resources” and “assets” to be developed. In particular, it is argued that it is important to nurture the developmental assets such as psychosocial skills in children and adolescents. The notion of positive youth development bears striking resemblance to the beliefs of Chinese medicine and holistic medicine, which maintains that when a person has inner strengths and talents, the chance of becoming ill will be reduced.
(Imprint: Nova)

Introduction
pp. xiii

Chapter 1
Youth Development Around the World
(Daniel TL Shek, Joav Merrick, Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)
pp. 1-4

Section One: Screening, Health and the Youth
pp. 5

Chapter 2
Regular Health Checkups for Young Adults
(Laura A Nabors, Heather D Lehmkuhl-Yardley, Anna M Drury-Egan, Irina S Parkins, and Emily A Iobst, School of Human Services, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, and others)
pp. 7-12

Chapter 3
School Screening for Scoliosis
(Debbie Ehrmann Feldman, Marie Beauséjour, José Félix Sosa, Lise Goulet, Stefan Parent, Hubert Labelle, and the members of the Quebec Scoliosis Society and the Canadian Pediatric Spinal Deformities Study Group, Université de Montréal, Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire en réadaptation, Montréal, Canada, and others)
pp. 13-22

Chapter 4
Adolescent Health: Families, Peers, Schools and Neighborhoods
(Mark J Benson, and Caitlin Faas, Department of Human Development, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia and Department of Psychology, Mount St Mary’s University, Emmitsburg, Maryland, USA)
pp. 23-46

Section Two: Activity and Youth
pp. 47

Chapter 5
Light Physical Activity among a Group of Rural Adolescents
(Molly R Matthews-Ewald, George A Kelley, Matthew Gurka, Stephanie S Frost, Lucas C Moore, Carole V Harris, Andrew S Bradlyn, Keith J Zullig, Kevin Larkin, and Meghan E Reeves, Department of Social and Behavioral Science, West Virginia University, West Virginia, USA, and others)
pp. 49-58

Chapter 6
Light Physical Activity and Class Environment
(Molly R Matthews-Ewald, George A Kelley, Matthew Gurka, Stephanie S Frost, Lucas C Moore, Carole V Harris, Andrew S Bradlyn, Keith J Zullig, and Kevin Larkin, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, West Virginia University, West Virginia, and others)
pp. 59-68

Section Three: Internet and Bullying
pp. 69

Chapter 7
Bonding and Internet Addiction in Hong Kong
(Daniel TL Shek, Moon YM Law, and Jianqiang Liang, Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)
pp. 71-82

Chapter 8
Cyberbullying in Adolescence
(Elizabeth L Mirsky and Hatim A Omar, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Kentucky Children’s Hospital, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, Kentucky, USA)
pp. 83-86

Chapter 9
Bullying Victimization in School Adolescents
(Mazyanga L Mazaba, Sricharan Pasupulati, Emmanuel Rudatsikira, Olusegun Babaniyi, Idah Ndumba, Freddie Masaninga, Adamson S Muula, Peter Songolo, and Seter Siziya, World Health Organisation, Lusaka, Zambia, and others)
pp. 87-98

Section Four: Youth Development
pp. 99

Chapter 10
Self-Image and Identity in Youth Development
(Søren Ventegodt, and Joav Merrick, Quality of Life Research Center, Copenhagen, Research Clinic for Holistic Medicine and Nordic School of Holistic Medicine, Copenhagen, Denmark, and others)
pp. 101-114

Chapter 11
The View of the Students in Evaluation of a School-Based Positive Youth Development Program
(Daniel TL Shek, Cecilia MS Ma, and Moon YM Law, Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)
pp. 115-134

Chapter 12
How do Program Implementers View Positive Youth Development Project?
(Daniel TL Shek, Janet TY Leung and Moon YM Law, Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)
pp. 135-148

Chapter 13
Programs for Adolescents with Greater Psychosocial Needs
(Daniel TL Shek, Cecilia MS Ma, Jocelyn Lin and Moon YM Law, Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)
pp. 149-168

Chapter 14
Behavioral Control, Psychological Control and Parent-Child Relationship
(Daniel TL Shek, and Moon YM Law, Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)
pp. 169-182

Section Five: Other Aspects of Adolescence
pp. 183

Chapter 15
Anorexia Nervosa in Adolescence
(Lyubov Matytsina, Donald E Greydanus, Irina V Babenko-Sorocopud, and Laura Matytsina, Obstetrics, Gynecology, Perinatology and Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, Donetsk Medical University, Ukraine, and others)
pp. 185-204

Chapter 16
Peer Support for Adolescents with Chronic Illness
(Sara Ahola Kohut, Jennifer Stinson, Margaret van Wyk, Lidia Giosa, and Stephanie Luca, Department of Child Health Evaluative Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada, and others)
pp. 205-224

Chapter 17
Iron Deficiency in Adolescent Athletes
(Aditya Dewoolkar, Neil D Patel, and Colleen Dodich, Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA, and others)
pp. 225-236

Chapter 18
Smoking among Nursing Students
(Mary C Gebhardt, Lawrence Bryant, Karis Casseus, Matthew Underwood, Julie M Cessna, and Shanta R Dube, Byrdine F Lewis School of Nursing, Health Professions, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, and others)
pp. 237-248

Chapter 19
Consumption of Refined Sugars in Adolescents
(Kameel Mungrue, Kimberley Taylor, Rhea Solomon, Deangria Carey, Rogers Moeng, and Shirrell Lewis, Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Public Health and Primary Care Unit, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, EWMSC, Mt Hope, Trinidad)
pp. 249-256

Section Six: Acknowledgements
pp. 257

Chapter 20
About the Editor
pp. 259-260

Chapter 21
About the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Israel
pp. 261-264

Chapter 22
About the Book Series “Pediatrics, Child and Adolescent Health”
pp. 265-268

Section Seven: Index
pp. 269

Index
pp. 271-286

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