ADHD – A Transparent Impairment, Clinical, Daily-Life and Research Aspects in Diverse Populations

Miriam Itai Berger, MD
The Neuro-Cognitive Center, Pediatric Division, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel

Adina Maeir
School of occupational Therapy, Hadassah and the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel

Series: Neuroscience Research Progress
BISAC: PSY022010

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Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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Even experienced professionals might minimize the prevalence of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) among certain groups of patients. Decreased attention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity are sensitive but non-specific behavioral patterns, frequently reported in a wide range of children and adults with different disorders. Therefore, the existence of ADHD might become “transparent” for both the patients and the professionals. Such transparency might lead to a non-accurate diagnosis, harm the treatment aspects and have potential non beneficial prognostic aspects.

Among children and adults with mental retardation, autistic spectrum disorders, and drug abuse, as well as among gifted children, children with sensory modulation disorders, and children who were born IUGR, the diagnosis of ADHD might be very challenging. It seems that among these “double-diagnosis” populations there is a higher prevalence of patients with ADHD than in the general population, yet the exact prevalence, diagnostic difficulties and treatment methods have not been clearly estimated or established. It also seems that the percentage of ADHD among adolescents and children with chronic illness is still underestimated, since its clinical characteristics tend to be different. During the last years there have been growing numbers of publications in this field, but due to the wide range of interested professionals, these studies are published in a wide range of journals, usually missing some of their “target” populations. There is a lack of volumes gathering relevant data for a broad range of interested professionals from different specialties.

The objective of this book is to serve as a useful tool for a wide range of professionals with a special interest in the unusual aspects of ADHD in order to increase their knowledge, sensitivity and treatment methods among our transparent patients. (Imprint: Nova)

Preface

Chapter 1 - It Takes a Village to Care for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Improving Management Collaboration between Tertiary Care Centers and the Community (pp. 1-16)
Ortal Slobodin, Ph.D. and Itai Berger, M.D. (The Neuro-Cognitive Center, Division of Pediatyrics, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel)

Chapter 2 - The Teen Cog-Fun Model of Intervention for Adolescents with ADHD (pp. 17-34)
Nirit Levanon-Erez and Adina Maeir, Ph.D. (School of Occupational Therapy, Hadassah and Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel)

Chapter 3 - Giftedness and ADHD (pp. 35-44)
Iris Manor, M.D. (Geha MHC, Petach-Tiqva, Israel)

Chapter 4 - The Relationship between ADHD and SMD (pp. 45-70)
Aviva Yochman, Ph.D. and Tal Mazor-Karsenty (School of Occupational Therapy, Hadassah and Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel)

Chapter 5 - Intrauterine Growth Retardation and ADHD (pp. 71-80)
Noa Ofek-Shlomai, M.D. (Department of Neonatology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel)

Chapter 6 - Cognitive Functional (Cog-Fun) Intervention for Children with ADHD: Theory and Practice (pp. 81-98)
Adina Maeir, Ph.D., Jeri Hahn-Markowitz, Orit Fisher and Ruth Traub Bar-Ilan (School of Occupational Therapy, Hadassah and Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel)

Chapter 7 - ADHD among Children with Significant Developmental Delay or Intellectual Disability (pp. 99-118)
Michal Begin, M.D. (Leumit HMO, Jerusalem, Israel)

Chapter 8 - DSM-5, Connectivity and Neuropathology: ADHD and Autism As an Example (pp. 119-132)
Hanoch Cassuto, M.D., Ph.D. (Pediatric Neurology Clinic, Leumit and Clalit HMO, Jersualem, Israel)

Chapter 9 - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder among Children with Chronic Diseases (pp. 133-152)
Itai Berger, M.D. (The Neuro-Cognitive Center, Division of Pediatrics, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel)

Chapter 10 - Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Substance Use Disorders (pp. 153-172)
Geurt van de Glind, Ph.D. (Trimbos-institute and ICASA Foundation, Utrecht, the Netherlands)

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